The Future Is Near As Loving Relationships Between Humans And Robots Become A Reality (7 pics)

Words of an artificial intelligence expert David Levy seem to start coming true, as human-robot relationships are now real, with French woman Lilly fell in love with a robot she 3D-printed herself. She says she is only attracted to robots since the age of 19, and her relationships with men only proved to her that she dislikes contact with human flesh. As she writes on her Twitter page, they are now engaged with her robot for almost a year and will marry as soon as human-robot marriages are legalized in France.







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Santa Is Welcomed In A Very Unconventional Way In This House (4 pics)

"Four years ago I told my daughter that Santa was tired of milk and cookies. She still believes me to this day."

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Operation Christmas Drop

For the last sixty four years the US army has been playing Santa Claus to some 20,000 people inhabiting dozens of tiny Micronesian islands spread across a vast area in the western Pacific Ocean. Each year in December, these islanders receive all sorts of gifts and useful supplies packed in approximately a hundred crates and dropped gently to earth on green military parachutes. Known as Operation Christmas Drop, this effort on the part of the United States Air Force has been called the “longest running humanitarian mission in the world.”

Operation Christmas Drop has its roots to the Christmas of 1952, when the crew of an Air Force B-29 aircraft, flying a mission to the south of Guam, saw some of the islanders waving at them. In the spirit of the season, the crew gathered some items they had on the plane, placed them in a container, attached a parachute and dropped the bundle to the islanders below.
A witness to the first drop on the island recalls, "We saw these things come out of the back of the airplane and I was yelling: 'There are toys coming down'". The effort grew from there into a major annual training exercise.

All the gifts are donated by residents, civic organizations, military personnel and businesses of Guam, which are collected by private organization and the US Air Force, and then sorted and packed into boxes. The items sent to the Micronesian include fishing nets, construction materials, powdered milk, canned goods, rice, coolers, clothing, shoes, toys, school supplies and so on.

The Air Force uses old parachutes that have outlived their military usefulness, but are still strong enough to support bundles weighing up to 500 pounds. The parachute is said to be the most important item on the bundle. Islanders use it for a variety of applications, from roofing their houses to covering their canoes.

Some of these islands are so remote that they receive supplies from passing ships only once or twice per year.

“Christmas Drop is the most important day of the year for these people," said Bruce Best, a communications specialist at the University of Guam who has been volunteering his time to help Operation Christmas Drop for the last 34 year.

“The yearly success of this drop is a testament to the generosity of the civilian and military population of Guam,” said U.S. Air Force sergeant and Operation Christmas Drop committee president. “We continue to do this to help improve the quality of life of the islanders. We may take it for granted that we can go to a mall to purchase our daily needs, but these folks do not have the same privilege from where they live.”

In recent years, the US Air Force has received assistance from members of the Royal Australian Air Force and Japan Air Self-Defense Force in the collection and distribution of the Christmas Drop crates. According to organizational data, by 2006, the Christmas drop operations have delivered more than 800,000 pounds of supplies.











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Ranking Of The World’s Most Educated Countries (11 pics)

The World Economic Forum created the index using different measurements to rank the most educated countries in the world with the highest score being seven. The factors the score is based on include the rate at which people studied at a university or an equivalent as well as on five questions given by business leaders from each country like "In your country, how well does the education system meet the needs of a competitive economy?" and "In your country, to what extent do companies invest in training and employee development?"

 11. Iceland
Score: 5.9

(1 is the lowest educational standard; 7 is the highest)

The tiny Nordic country of Iceland has a population of 330,000. Though it ranks highly in the global index, it spends the least of the Nordic countries on educational spending.

10. New Zealand
Score: 5.9

New Zealand constantly ranks among the top education systems in the world. The country's education department is innovative: In September, the government outlined plans to introduce online education courses, in which students are not required to attend school on certain days of the week.

9. Australia
Score: 5.9

Australia is a well-educated country and has a particularly high proportion of tertiary-educated adults. Forty-three percent of adults have trained at an institution after leaving school — that's behind only Canada, Japan, Israel, Korea, the US, and the UK.

8. United States
Score: 5.9

A large proportion of adults in America, 43%, have a university education. That is the fifth-highest proportion in the the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, an intergovernmental group of 34 developed countries.

7. Norway
Score: 5.9

Norway has high levels of taxation and invests heavily in education. It devotes an annual expenditure of about £11,000 ($14,000) per pupil from primary to tertiary education — the third-highest figure in the OECD.

6. Denmark
Score: 5.9

Denmark is the OECD country that spent the largest share of its wealth on education, with a total expenditure on educational institutions of 7.9% of its gross domestic product. It is a major priority in the country, one of the few countries where education expenditure actually grew during the financial crash of 2008-2010.

5. Belgium
Score: 6.0

In Belgium, higher education pays: Unemployment rates for those with a tertiary education is just 3%. Unemployment rates are lower than the European average for every other level of education, too.
Teaching is a well-paid profession in the country: Teachers' salaries are £57,000 ($74,000) on average adjusted for purchasing power. The OECD average is £39,000 ($52,000).

4. Switzerland
Score: 6.0

A large majority of Switzerland's population has attained a full secondary education: 86% of 25- to 64-year-olds. The country spends a lot on it: an average of £12,500 ($16,000) per student per year, compared with the EU average of £7,500 ($9,500).

3. Netherlands
Score: 6.1

The Dutch rank highly in many fields of education. A third of Dutch 25- to 64-year-olds hold a university degree, which is significantly higher than the OECD average of 24%.

2. Finland
Score: 6.2

Finland's education system is widely acclaimed, especially since the 2010 documentary "Waiting for Superman" compared it favourably with the US's. Teachers are selected from the top 10% of the country's graduates and are required to earn a master's degree in education.

1. Singapore
Score: 6.3

Singapore's education system is the most highly regarded in the world, but it is also known as a "pressure cooker" for its intensity and strictness. Global comparisons of maths and science ability are often topped by Singapore's school system.

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FML Dump






























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