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Former soldier, 89, who was living in squalour in an old workshop thanks his ENTIRE town after it joins together to raise £16,000 and transform his 'appalling' property into his forever home

Former soldier, 89, who was living in squalour in an old workshop thanks his ENTIRE town after it joins together to raise £16,000 and transform his 'appalling' property into his forever home
A former soldier living in a squalid two-storey outhouse has thanked an entire town who joined together to transform his 'appalling' property into a home fit for a hero.
Carl Marshall, 89, was forced to leave his home in Glossop, Derbyshire a year ago when he fell ill after spending almost three decades living in a shed next to his family's former home. 
The outhouse had few of the comforts of modern living, with no heating, no downstairs window, and no bath or shower. It was even plagued with damp and mice.
The retired park ranger, who has no family and is a regular at The Oakwood pub, had never told anyone about his poor living conditions.
But when Mr Marshall fell ill with pneumonia, those at his local discovered just how desperate his living situation was, and gathered dozens of volunteers to raise £16,000 for an astonishing refurbishment. 
Carl Marshall, 89, was forced to leave his home in Glossop, Derbyshire a year ago when he fell ill (Pictured: Mr Marshall in his home before the renovation)
Carl Marshall, 89, was forced to leave his home in Glossop, Derbyshire a year ago when he fell ill (Pictured: Mr Marshall in his home before the renovation)
Pictured: Mr Marshall in his new living room
The old interior of Mr Marshall's two-storey home was ripped out and completely rebuilt
The Ex-Coldstream Guard said he was 'blown away' by the support of his community, who worked tirelessly to transform his home in just 10 months.
'I hope to go into the local firms and thank them personally for their time and material, like the carpet, and all the many other things they did,' he said. 'Just to say with much gratitude thank you, thank you, thank you.'
'And the best way of doing that is that I hope to stay here for a long, long time.'
Mr Marshall moved into the adjacent home in Dinting Vale with his parents in 1941, and grew up amongst the rows of beautiful stone houses.
His outhouse had few of the comforts of modern living, with no heating, no downstairs window, and no bath or shower. It was also plagued with damp (pictured) and mice
His outhouse had few of the comforts of modern living, with no heating, no downstairs window, and no bath or shower. It was also plagued with damp (pictured) and mice
The retired park ranger, who has no family but is a regular at The Oakwood pub, had never told anyone about his poor living conditions (Pictured: the bathroom before)
The retired park ranger, who has no family but is a regular at The Oakwood pub, had never told anyone about his poor living conditions (Pictured: the bathroom before)
The former soldier said the new bathroom should be featured in a 'posh' magazine
The old interior of Mr Marshall's two-storey home was ripped out and completely rebuilt (pictured, his bathroom)
The new bathroom in Carl Marshall's home in Glossop, Derbyshire which was renovated by a group of good samaritans from his local pub
The new bathroom in Carl Marshall's home in Glossop, Derbyshire which was renovated by a group of good samaritans from his local pub
After the £16,000 transformation, Mr Marshall said his new bathroom (pictured) should be 'given an award'
After the £16,000 transformation, Mr Marshall said his new bathroom (pictured) should be 'given an award'
He left to join the Army in 1952 and served in Cyprus and Egypt, but two years later he returned to Derbyshire. 
Mr Marshall never married or had children, and after the death of both his parents 28 years ago, he decided to sell the terraced property. 
Afterwards, he moved into the two-storey shed once used as a cattery, tucked away at the back of the property in a private courtyard. Since then, it has been his home.
Mr Marshall is a regular at The Oakwood pub, which he catches a bus or takes a taxi to for a glass of red wine every day expect Sunday.
The retired park ranger (pictured after the renovation) who has no family and is a regular at The Oakwood pub, had never told anyone about his poor living conditions
The retired park ranger (pictured after the renovation) who has no family and is a regular at The Oakwood pub, had never told anyone about his poor living conditions
Mr Marshall, pictured in his refurbished living room today, says he was 'blown away' by the support of his community
Mr Marshall, pictured in his refurbished living room today, says he was 'blown away' by the support of his community

The state of his home was first noticed by landlady Alison Swithenbank after she decided to take Mr Marshall out for his birthday last November.
She said: 'We took over the pub in April 2018 and straight away we took to Carl, he was such a warm friendly man, who was full of stories about his life and travels.
'But until we went out for his birthday I had no idea how bad the conditions were that he lived in. It just wasn't fit.
'It was shocking that anyone could live like that, but Carl is such a gent, he didn't want to bother anyone, so no-one knew. But when we saw it we had to do something.'
Pictured: Carl Marshall
Pictured: Mr Marshall in his youth
When Mr Marshall (left and right as a soldier) fell ill with pneumonia, the community gathered dozens of volunteers to raise £16,000 for an astonishing home refurbishment
In total around 50 volunteers (pictured) have worked on the project, raising £16,000 in donated cash and materials to carry out a refurbishment that would have cost £80,000
In total around 50 volunteers (pictured) have worked on the project, raising £16,000 in donated cash and materials to carry out a refurbishment that would have cost £80,000
Carl Marshall's home in Glossop, Derbyshire which was renovated by a group of good samaritans from his local pub
Carl Marshall's home in Glossop, Derbyshire which was renovated by a group of good samaritans from his local pub
Soon after his birthday, Mr Marshall fell ill with pneumonia which was believed to have been brought on by his living conditions. He was moved to a nearby supported living complex, where he stayed for 10 months. 
It was then that a group from The Oakwood got together and reached out to the town for help to make his small home warm, secure and fitted with the basic amenities. 
Volunteers donated time as well as money and materials in an endeavour to fulfill their wish to 'Get Carl Home for Christmas' - but that was at this time last year. 
Ms Swithenbank said: 'We were a bit naïve if we had known what we were getting into it would never have got off the ground.
'Within the first 24 hours of the fundraising we had £2,500 donated, after that we just had to keep going, but it has been a long, hard slog.'
Pictured: Mr Marshall sits on the bed in his home's newly refurbished bedroom
Pictured: Mr Marshall sits on the bed in his home's newly refurbished bedroom
Speaking after the renovation, Mr Marshall said: 'I hope to go into the local firms and thank them personally for their time and material, like the carpet, and all the many other things they did'
Speaking after the renovation, Mr Marshall said: 'I hope to go into the local firms and thank them personally for their time and material, like the carpet, and all the many other things they did'
In total around 50 volunteers have worked on the project, raising £16,000 in donated cash and materials to carry out a refurbishment that would have cost £80,000. 
Two of the most dedicated volunteers, Tom Styles and Les Wilcox, estimated they had put in about 1,800 hours between them.
'We've had £10,000 of materials donated by local firms including the new bathroom, the kitchen carpets,' said Ms Swithenbank.
'You name it someone has been kind enough to give it away for free, it really is a lovely tight knit community.
'Carl didn't want to leave his home and he couldn't sell it, it's not worth anything to anyone but him.'
A group from The Oakwood (pictured) got together and reached out to the town for help to make his small home warm, secure and fitted with the basic amenities
A group from The Oakwood (pictured) got together and reached out to the town for help to make his small home warm, secure and fitted with the basic amenities
Carl Marshall, 89 sitting in his living room at home in Glossop, Derbyshire which was renovated by a group of good samaritans from his local pub The Oakwood - 31st October 2019.  A popular pub regular has thanked a town who rallied to give his "appalling" home a makeover.  Carl Marshall, 89, left his house in Glossop a year ago over fears it was bad for his health.  It had no heating or carpets and was plagued by damp and mice - conditions that shocked those who saw it.  To help, the community of the Derbyshire town came together over 11 months to completely rebuild the inside of the house.  Now, thanks to their time and money, Mr Marshall has been able to return home in time for his 90th birthday on 16 November.
Mr Marshall, 89 sitting in his living room at home in Glossop, Derbyshire
In the renovation, the old interior was ripped out and completely rebuilt. In the bathroom, the shower did not work and the bath was not plumbed in, there was little heating, no insulation and only enough electricity to run a cooker and a TV.
A window was installed in the lounge so for the first time Mr Marshall can look out at the world from his ground floor.
A new gas main has been installed, so he will no longer have to run his heating from expensive liquefied petroleum gas as he has done for years.  
Ms Swithenbank, who sees Mr Marshall as her 'adopted' grandfather, believes the project has provided a lifeline for him.
She said: 'I guess we've extended his life because he wouldn't have survived coming back home after falling ill with pneumonia. That's what started this off - if he had have come back I don't think he would be here now.
'We have a long list of things that he wants to continue improving such as outside and the outhouse, so that's the next step.
'I lost my grandparents when I was 13 and having someone of his age in my life, which I haven't had for years, is really special.'
Mr Marshall described his new pad as a 'show home' and said he was 'thrilled' to be back.
'I've been absolutely blown away. I literally have, what with all the work that was done here, with all the lighting and wiring. The bathroom should be given an award in one of those posh magazines,' he said.
'The house looks marvellous, it's absolutely incredible what they've done, it's very swish.
'Alison and everyone have been so kind. I almost 90, but in recent months I have learnt more about friendship, not just in words but in deeds, than in the rest of my life.' 

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