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The lonely goodbye: Heartbroken family of terminally-ill teen, 18, who brought a smile to Prince Harry, can only invite 10 mourners to funeral and can’t touch her coffin during coronavirus crisis

The lonely goodbye: Heartbroken family of terminally-ill teen, 18, who brought a smile to Prince Harry, can only invite 10 mourners to funeral and can’t touch her coffin during coronavirus crisis
  • Holly Smallman was cremated yesterday and only 10 people allowed to attend
  • The teenager suffered from cerebral palsy, epilepsy and chronic lung disease 
  • People across the UK dressed in pink to show their support for Holly's family 
  • Coronavirus symptoms: what are they and should you see a doctor?
The devastated mother and family of a terminally-ill teenager were not able to touch her coffin and could only invite 10 people to her funeral because of the coronavirus
Holly Smallman, 18, was cremated yesterday in Anfield, Liverpool, but new council regulations, enforced to try to stop the spread of coronavirus, meant that only 10 people were allowed to attend.
She was severely ill for the majority of her life and suffered from cerebral palsy, epilepsy and chronic lung disease. She needed 24-hour care. 
Holly Smallman, 18, was cremated yesterday in Anfield, Liverpool, but new council regulations, enforced to try to stop the spread of coronavirus, meant that only 10 people were allowed to attend
Holly Smallman, 18, was cremated yesterday in Anfield, Liverpool, but new council regulations, enforced to try to stop the spread of coronavirus, meant that only 10 people were allowed to attend
Hayley said: 'I know we've got to get through but this was our last chance to say goodbye to our little girl, and it's been taken away from us'
Prince Harry visited the hospice she was at in 2015 and even presented her younger sister, Ruby, with a Wellchild Award and wrote her a letter of thanks for the loving way she cared for Holly
Prince Harry visited the hospice she was at in 2015 and even presented her younger sister, Ruby, with a Wellchild Award and wrote her a letter of thanks for the loving way she cared for Holly
Hundreds were due to attend Holly's funeral but in a series of devastating blows, no funeral cars were used and chairs inside Anfield crematorium were placed a safe distance apart
Hundreds were due to attend Holly's funeral but in a series of devastating blows, no funeral cars were used and chairs inside Anfield crematorium were placed a safe distance apart
Across Britain hundreds of well-wishers dressed in pink to show their support, in accordance with Hayley's wishes
Across Britain hundreds of well-wishers dressed in pink to show their support, in accordance with Hayley's wishes
Hayley attended alongside her husband Gary, 46, their children, Ruby, 12, and Josh, 21, and her grandparents and aunt Rachel. 
Haylely added: 'I know we've got to get through but this was our last chance to say goodbye to our little girl, and it's been taken away from us.' 
Across Britain hundreds of well-wishers dressed in pink to show their support, in accordance with Hayley's wishes.   
Plans have been discussed to have a big celebration later in the year, hopefully once Covid-19 has passed, to share memories of the much-loved teenager and her short life. 

What are the rules for organising funerals during the coronavirus crisis?  

Funerals are still allowed under the government's new guidelines but some adjustments have been made. 
Can I still arrange a funeral?  
Funerals should continue as normally as possible. 
However, individual councils, crematoriums and funeral homes may have imposed their own guidelines. 
In general, families are being asked to consider restricting attendance to 'close family members' to reduce the risk of spreading coronavirus to attendees and staff involved in the ceremony.
It is no longer appropriate to hold a gathering after the ceremony at any venue, including the family home.
Also, individual crematoriums may have their own guidance and this should be considered when arranging a funeral. 
They may also provide online broadcasting so mourners can watch the service without attending in person.
When arranging a funeral, you must consider the wider guidelines in place at the moment, including social distancing, good hand hygiene, avoiding physical contact and to be particularly mindful of those in at-risk groups (such as those over 70). 
What changes on the day?  
Wait outside in the car until you're asked to enter the building by the celebrant, chapel attendant or funeral director. 
Don't shake hands with anyone, including the minister, funeral director or other mourners. 
Bring hand sanitiser and use hygiene products made available at the venue. Allow staff to open and close doors to the service to restrict the number of people touching door handles. 
Numbers in the venue are likely to be limited. 
Stick to any assigned seating plans and keep your distance from other mourners. 
You may be advised not to touch the coffin as you leave the service.  

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