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Could bruises on your FEET be a sign of coronavirus? Doctors suspect a link after patients with chickenpox-like lesions on their toes test positive for the killer infection - as another study warns headaches and feeling dizzy may also be signs of COVID-19

Could bruises on your FEET be a sign of coronavirus? Doctors suspect a link after patients with chickenpox-like lesions on their toes test positive for the killer infection - as another study warns headaches and feeling dizzy may also be signs of COVID-19
  • 'Numerous cases' have been reported in Spain as well as Italy and France
  • The mysterious symptom has mostly appeared in children and young adults 
  • Loss of smell, taste and diarrhoea have also been reported as atypical symptoms 
  • For information on coronavirus symptoms, go to the NHS website 
Bruising and lesions on the feet could be a sign of coronavirus, doctors in Spain suspect.
Patients with deep purple chickenpox-like marks on their toes have tested positive for the killer infection.
'Numerous cases' have been reported in Spain as well as Italy and France, as the disease continues to rage across Europe.
One of the first reported cases was a 13-year-old boy in Italy, whose lesions - initially thought to be caused by a spider bite - turned black and crusted. 
Experts warn the mysterious symptom has primarily been spotted in children and teenagers.
But skin manifestations potentially caused by the virus were seen in one in five patients in an Italian hospital.
Typically the SARS-CoV-2 virus causes a persistent cough and fever. But recently studies have alerted diarrhoea, skin marks, testicular pain and a loss of taste and smell as 'atypical' signs. 
A large number of people who contract COVID-19 also experience headaches and dizziness, according to a study in China. Bruising and lesions on the feet could be a sign of coronavirus, doctors in Spain suspect. One of the first reported cases was a 13-year-old boy in Italy (pictured)
Bruising and lesions on the feet could be a sign of coronavirus, doctors in Spain suspect. One of the first reported cases was a 13-year-old boy in Italy (pictured)
The teenager in Italy saw his lesions - initially thought to be caused by a spider bite - turn black and crusted. He and his family had symptoms of the coronavirus

The teenager in Italy saw his lesions - initially thought to be caused by a spider bite - turn black and crusted. He and his family had symptoms of the coronavirus 
The Spanish General Council of Official Podiatrist Colleges described patients who had purple lesions - very similar to those of chickenpox, measles or chilblains
The marks usually appear on the toes, but are not permanent
Experts warn the mysterious symptom has been spotted in children and teenagers the most
The Spanish General Council of Official Podiatrist Colleges shared a statement revealing the 'curious finding'.
It described patients who had purple lesions - very similar to those of chickenpox, measles or chilblains - which usually appear on the toes.
The same symptoms are 'increasingly being detected in patients with COVID -19, especially children and adolescents', according to podiatrists and dermatologists.
The marks have also been seen in adults, and normally heal without leaving a scar or similar.
The college, which has 7,500 members, said it was aware of similar findings in Italy and France. 
Medical experts in Spain are now collecting a database of people who have tested positive for the virus as well as having marks on their feet. 
And dermatologists from different Spanish health centers are leading the 'COVID-Skin' study, to categorise lesions which have been spotted in COVID-19 patients. 
The General Council of Official Colleges of Podiatrists opened a registry last Thursday, and told its members to 'be very vigilant'.
It advised to quarantine children when such marks are spotted - but not to act with 'unfounded alarmism'. 
The International Federation of Podiatrists (FIP-IFP) reported one of the first cases of the symptom in a 13-year-old boy from Bari, southern Italy.
As it stands there is not enough 'scientific evidence' to support the link between marks on the feet and the coronavirus
One theory is that skin eruptions are caused by the closure of tiny blood vessels, which might be induced by the nervous system in response to the virus
Podiatrists and dermatologists have been advised to quarantine children when such marks are spotted - but not to act with 'unfounded alarmism'

WHAT ARE THE COMMON AND 'ATYPICAL' SYMPTOMS OF COVID-19? 

The NHS website states that the symptoms of COVID-19 are:
  • A high temperature
  • A new, continuous cough
The World Health Organisation says other indicators include fatigue, aches and pains, a blocked nose, sore throat and diarrhoea. 
As the coronavirus infects millions globally, anecdotal and scientific studies have spotted some other 'atypical' symptoms:
Headaches and dizziness
A study in China found that 13 per cent of 214 patients hospitalised with COVID-19 had headaches, and 17 per cent reported dizziness. Overall more than a third reported neurological symptoms. 
The team explained the symptoms may be due to the way in which the virus attaches to cells in the body - through ACE2 receptors found in human organs and tissues within the nervous system. 
Loss of taste and smell
Data gathered by ENT UK, which represents ear, nose and throat specialists, suggests an inability to smell — and often taste — may be the very first symptom and can start within hours.
Those with the symptom are thought to be mostly healthy young adults whose immune systems react sufficiently to the virus to contain it within the nose, preventing it spreading to the lungs, where it can cause potentially fatal pneumonia.
Testicular pain
In February, scientists in China claimed the virus could attack the male reproductive organs - but there is not enough robust research to prove it.
The virus binds to the ACE2 receptors on cells which are found in abundance in the testes, and could lead to 'tissue damage', the team speculated in their paper, which has not been peer-reviewed.
A 42-year-old man from America tested positive for the coronavirus after going to hospital with testicular pain, even though there were no signs of abnormalities.
Skin changes
A study of 88 coronavirus patients at Alessandro Manzoni Hospital in Lecco, northern Italy, found one in five complained of skin manifestations.
They had not taken any medications or drugs in the preceding 15 days, which could have caused a skin reaction. 
'Numerous cases' of chickenpox-like marks on the feet have been reported in Spain, Italy and France, mostly in children.  
The phenomenon is not well researched. But one theory is that skin eruptions are caused by the closure of tiny blood vessels, which might be induced by the nervous system in response to the virusand one patient had chickenpox-like marks.
These skin manifestations 'are similar to cutaneous involvement occurring during common viral infections', author of the report Dr Sebastiano Recalcati said.
Doctors in Thailand - the first country outside of China to report a coronavirus case - have raised concerns that skin problems potentially caused by the coronavirus will be wrongly diagnosed as something else.
They described how a Thai man with COVID-19 was first falsely diagnosed with dengue fever because he had the typical tiny purple, red, or brown spots on the skin. 

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