Full width home advertisement

Post Page Advertisement [Top]

Doctor who took part in remdesivir study says it's a ‘glimmer of hope’ that can be combined with other drugs to give COVID-19 patients 'tailored therapies' - as Fauci calls the market-boosting medicine proof the virus CAN be stopped

Doctor who took part in remdesivir study says it's a ‘glimmer of hope’ that can be combined with other drugs to give COVID-19 patients 'tailored therapies' - as Fauci calls the market-boosting medicine proof the virus CAN be stopped
  • The study showed that patient who were given the Ebola drug recovered from coronavirus 31% faster than whose who did not 
  • It also reduced the mortality rate among them from 11.6% to 8% 
  • Dr. Fauci said on Wednesday the results were 'really quite important' and showed a drug can block the virus 
  • The FDA may approve the drug as early as Thursday to try to fast track a treatment
  • The flurry of enthusiasm boosted the stock markets and sent shares of Gilead Sciences, which makes the drug, up by nearly 7% 
  • Dr. Aneesh Mehta was among the doctors who gave patients the drug for the study 
  • He told Good Morning America it was a 'glimmer of hope' in the fight against COVID-19 
  • Other studies, including one in China, suggest the drug is less effective 
One of the doctors behind a promising remdesivir study which shows it can be used as a treatment for COVID-19 has called it a 'glimmer of hope' and says he is now studying how to use the Ebola drug with other medications to give patients 'tailored therapies'. 
His promising comments came on Thursday morning after Dr. Fauci, the nation's leading coronavirus expert, said the drug breakthrough was 'very important' and proved that a drug can stop the virus.  
The study was government sponsored and involved more than 1,000 patients taking part around the world. It showed that those who were given remdesivir recovered 31 percent faster than the patients who received a placebo drug. 
The mortality rate among those who were given the drug was 3.6 percent less than among those who didn't; it was 8 percent in the drug recipients and 11.6 percent in placebo patients. 
While the results do not give a cure-all solution, they have injected the markets with hope and share prices for its producer, Californian company Gilead Sciences , went through the roof. 
It came despite the fact that a Chinese study found the drug was not as effective as US enthusiasm for it would suggest. 
In an interview with Good Morning America on Thursday, Dr. Aneesh Mehta of Emory University Medical School - one of the institutions which took part in the study - spoke of its success. 
Scroll down for video 
Dr. Aneesh Mehta of Emory University Medical School was one of the dozens of doctors from 47 US institutions which took part in the study. He called it a 'glimmer of hope' on Thursday
Dr. Aneesh Mehta of Emory University Medical School was one of the dozens of doctors from 47 US institutions which took part in the study. He called it a 'glimmer of hope' on Thursday 
It gives doctors and disease experts hope that it will enable to the healthcare system to move more seamlessly through the pandemic by treating patients on a faster time scale, which will not only save their lives but also keeps hospitals from becoming overwhelmed with cases. 
The study showed that among 1,000 patients from around the world, those who got the drug recovered 31% faster and had a mortality rate 3% lower than those who did not
The study showed that among 1,000 patients from around the world, those who got the drug recovered 31% faster and had a mortality rate 3% lower than those who did not 
Dr. Mehta said on Thursday that the next phase would be to study how best to use the drug as part of a combination with others to give patients whose cases vary in their severity the best course of treatment. 
'Having taken care of patients for eight weeks now... we've been getting patients better but we're now looking to find a medication that gets them better and faster and home to their families.  
'Now, we have the first glimmer of hope of something that can do that,' he said. 
He added that while the data was 'preliminary', it is promising. 
Doctors want to give patients the drug as early as possible after they are diagnosed.
'Most antivirals tend to work better earlier in the course of disease. We definitely like to offer this earlier. It's intravenous so can only be given in the hospital but we're planning to offer it as early as possible,' he said. 
Dr Mehta's team is now working with the National Institute of Health to combine the drug with others to get even better results, he said. 
'We want to learn what additional medications are needed to really improve the outcome. 
'All patients are different so we want to make sure we're tailoring their therapy. 
'We want to integrate these therapies into this overall model of care that they are receiving,' he said. 
Shares of Gilead Sciences, the Californian drug manufacturer which makes remdesivir, soared
Shares of Gilead Sciences, the Californian drug manufacturer which makes remdesivir, soared 
On Wednesday night Fauci heralded the trial results as 'really quite important'. 
'The data shows that remdesivir has a clear-cut, significant, positive effect in diminishing the time to recovery.  
Dr. Fauci said the results were 'really quite important'
Dr. Fauci said the results were 'really quite important' 
'Although a 31 percent improvement doesn't seem like a knockout 100 percent, it is very important proof of concept. 
'What it has proven is that a drug can block this virus,' he said.  
But a separate study out of China has cast doubt on the enthusiasm for it.
The study was published in the prestigious Lancet medical journal and involved 237 people. 
It was stopped early because the researchers had difficulty recruiting people when the outbreak was curbed in Wuhan. 
Scientists believe the stark contrast in findings may come down to when remdesivir is given.
One patient who was given the drug recalled being unable to breathe until he got remdesivir. 
'It still hurt but it had dropped off quite a bit,' Chris Kane, 55, said. 
On Wednesday, share prices for Gilead Sciences went up by nearly seven percent. 

WHAT HAVE THREE STUDIES SHOWN OF REMDESIVIR? 

1. The Adaptive Covid-19 Treatment Trial
How many people?
1,063, including 46 from the UK, over 70 hospitals globally.
What did it trial?
The placebo controlled study compared outcomes for hospitalised patients.
What did it find?
Patients given remdesivir had a recovery time that was almost a third (31 per cent) faster than those given a placebo.
Preliminary results also suggested a survival benefit, with a lower mortality rate of 8 per cent for the group receiving the drug, compared with 11.6 per cent for the placebo group. But this is not deemed a significant difference. 
Is it published?
No. You can find the preliminary findings on the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAD) website. 
2. Gilead Sciences' Phase 3 SIMPLE trial
How many people? 
397 hospitalised patients
What did it trial?
The study compared a five-day course of the drug with a 10-day course treatment. It looked at rates of patients recovering to the point where they no longer needed oxygen support and medical care or were sent home from hospital. 
It was not a placebo controlled study. 
What did it find? 
The pharmaceutical company reported that almost two-thirds of patients, or 129 out of 200 patients, recovered by day 14 after a five-day course of treatment. 
The longer treatment time didn't appear to provide any additional benefit, the company said. 
Is it published?
No. Gilead plans to publish the full data in a peer-reviewed journal in the coming weeks. A summary of the findings were published on its website
3. The Chinese study, led by Professor Bin Cao, from China-Japan Friendship Hospital and Capital Medical University in China.
How many people?
237 hospital COVID-19 patients at ten hospitals in Hubei, China.
The study was supposed to recruit 400, but the trial was halted because not enough patients were available due to the epidemic being curbed in Wuhan.
What did it trial? 
It was a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial - the golden standard - comparing recovery rates in patients either given remdesivir or a dummy drug.
What did it find?
Those on the placebo drug had similar outcomes to those given remdesivir. 
It took a shorter time for the remdesivir-treated patients to get better, 21 days compared with 23, but this is not statistically significant.
There was a one per cent difference in mortality rate between the two groups, which again, it's not clear if this means anything important. 
Is it published?
Yes, in the peer-reviewed journal The Lancet.  

No comments:

Post a comment

Bottom Ad [Post Page]