Full width home advertisement

Post Page Advertisement [Top]

Ex-society journalist, 92, who brushed shoulders with global superstars including Gregory Peck and Cary Grant over 30-year career becomes latest care home resident to die from coronavirus

Ex-society journalist, 92, who brushed shoulders with global superstars including Gregory Peck and Cary Grant over 30-year career becomes latest care home resident to die from coronavirus
  • Gulshan Ewing, 92 died last Saturday at a care home in Richmond, London
  • Devastated family received confirmation it was from coronavirus 24 hours later 
  • Care England claims that 7,500 residents have died from coronavirus 
  • Only 217 care home deaths officially recorded in England and Wales up to 3 April 
A former society journalist who rubbed shoulders with some of the world’s most famous people has become the latest victim of the coronavirus catastrophe sweeping through Britain’s care homes.
Gulshan Ewing, 92 died last Saturday in isolation at a care home in Richmond, South West London but her devastated family only received confirmation that it was from coronavirus 24 hours later.  
Her death comes as Care England, the country's largest representative body for care homes, claims that 7,500 residents are now feared to have died from coronavirus.
Only 217 care home deaths were officially recorded in England and Wales up to 3 April. There is a two-week delay on collecting data from care homes. Figures issued last Tuesday therefore only went up to 3 April. 
During an illustrious 30-year career, Mrs Ewing interviewed and socialised with Hollywood legends like Gregory Peck and Cary Grant, royalty, politicians and the great and the good from across the globe. Enjoying a glamorous existence in her native city of Mumbai, she mixed in celebrity circles and attended fashionable parties.
Society journalist Gulshan Ewing who has died from coroavirus (pictured left) mixed with many famous people including Cary Grant (right)
Society journalist Gulshan Ewing who has died from coroavirus (pictured left) mixed with many famous people including Cary Grant (right)
During an illustrious 30-year career, Mrs Ewing (right) interviewed numerous stars including Gregory Peck (left)
During an illustrious 30-year career, Mrs Ewing (right) interviewed numerous stars including Gregory Peck (left)
Gulshan Ewing (pictured left) who died last Saturday at a care home in Richmond, South West London along with daughter Anjali Ewing (right)
Gulshan Ewing (pictured left) who died last Saturday at a care home in Richmond, South West London along with daughter Anjali Ewing (right)
Her death underlines growing concerns over how authorities are handling the coronavirus pandemic facing Britain’s vulnerable care home residents with campaigners fuming that those with symptoms are not being properly treated while their deaths are not included in the daily tally of mortalities. 
After showing some symptoms of coronavirus for more than a week, Mrs Ewing’s daughter Anjali Ewing pleaded with health officials and even tweeted Health Secretary Matt Hancock and Prime Minister Boris Johnson for her to be tested immediately so that she could receive the necessary treatment.
According to her daughter, Gulshan's favourite actor, that she interviewed ,was Danny Kaye (pictured left with Gulshan right)
But it was not until last Wednesday that a swab was taken from her, as part of the government’s pledge to increase testing in care homes. It was only collected for delivery to a laboratory two days later.Despite her age, Mrs Ewing had no preexisting health conditions (pictured right with Roger Moore left)
Despite her age, Mrs Ewing had no preexisting health conditions. 
Anjali, 59, told MailOnline: ‘For more than a week we had no confirmation that my mother had coronavirus, and this just added to our worry. And when we eventually got it, she had already passed away. It was a case of too little, too late.
Despite her age, Mrs Ewing had no preexisting health conditions (pictured right with Roger Moore left)
But it was not until last Wednesday that a swab was taken from her, as part of the government’s pledge to increase testing in care homes. It was only collected for delivery to a laboratory two days later.
Despite her age, Mrs Ewing had no preexisting health conditions. 
Anjali, 59, told MailOnline: ‘For more than a week we had no confirmation that my mother had coronavirus, and this just added to our worry. And when we eventually got it, she had already passed away. It was a case of too little, too late.
After showing some symptoms of coronavirus for more than a week, Mrs Ewing’s daughter Anjali Ewing pleaded with health officials (Gulshan Ewing pictured centre along with Prince Charles pictured right)
Gulshan Ewing lived a very glamorous lifestyle (pictured left with Ava Gardner right)
‘Tests in care homes are not being done quickly enough and not enough are taking place. The elderly need to be prioritised because they are the most vulnerable when it comes to coronavirus. I wanted a proper diagnosis for my mother because that way, at least we could have worked out what she needed.’
She added: ‘If coronavirus gets into a care home it spreads very quickly. The focus seems to be on people in hospitals and the elderly are being forgotten. The way they are being dealt with in this current crisis is a disgrace.’
The daily number of UK-wide coronavirus deaths only includes people who died with the virus in hospital.
Stanley Park Care Home in County Durham is one of the worst hit in the country and staff are 'deeply saddened' by the deaths. 
The home's 14th death was reported on Friday when a resident passed away after being transferred to hospital with the virus.   
Meanwhile 17 residents have died at the Castletroy Residential home in Luton. Five of those who died had tested positive for Covid-19.   

The Coronavirus crisis in UK care homes 

Care England claims that 7,500 residents have died from coronavirus. 
The daily number of coronavirus deaths announced by the government only includes people who died with the virus in hospital. 
There is a two-week delay on collecting data from care homes. Figures issued last Tuesday only went up to 3 April.
Only 217 care home deaths were officially recorded in England and Wales up to 3 April.
The Castletroy Residential home in Luton is one of the worst affected.
17 residents have died at the Luton home. Five of those who died had tested positive for Covid-19. 
Stanley Park Care Home in County Durham recorded its 14th death on Friday.
Official figures have revealed a quarter of all coronavirus deaths in Scotland have been in care homes.
Berelands Care Home, Prestwick, Scotland has had 20 of its residents die due to suspected coronavirus. 

While official figures have revealed a quarter of all coronavirus deaths in Scotland have been in care homes.  A total of 20 residents at a single care home in Scotland were reported to have died due to suspected coronavirus.
Data from the National Records of Scotland showed 962 people diagnosed with, or suspected of having, COVID-19 had died.
Of those, 237 (24.6 per cent) were in care homes, 586 in hospitals, 128 in homes and one in an undisclosed location.
The figure was five times higher than the 5 per cent number given by the Office for National Statistics, which collates data in England and Wales. 
Berelands Care Home, Prestwick, Scotland has had 20 of its residents die due to suspected coronavirus 
Anjali Ewing revealed that she chose to publicise pictures of her mother’s dazzling career and life because she wanted to remember her as more than just a victim of the coronavirus pandemic
She added: ‘So many elderly people have made a contribution to their country, families and professions but in this current climate it’s genuinely hard to honour their achievements because of restrictions on mourners at funerals and social distancing rules that have made it difficult to hold commemoration services.
Anjali Ewing revealed that she chose to publicise pictures of her mother’s dazzling career and life because she wanted to remember her as more than just a victim of the coronavirus pandemic (Guishan pictured left along with Lord Astor pictured right)
Mrs Ewing was editor of two of India’s most influential publications; women’s magazine, Eve’s Weekly and film magazine, Star & Style (pictured here with Kirk Douglas)
Guishan Ewing had access to the rich and famous as she interviewed and partied with them (pictured with Alfred Hitchcock)
Guishan Ewing had access to the rich and famous as she interviewed and partied with them (pictured with Alfred Hitchcock)
‘I wanted to recognise my mother’s life and all the wonderful, amazing experiences she had.’
Born in 1928 to a Parsi family in Mumbai, which was known as Bombay at the time, Mrs Ewing was editor of two of India’s most influential publications; women’s magazine, Eve’s Weekly and film magazine, Star & Style.
After being appointed in 1966, visiting celebrities saw it as a badge of honour to be featured in them, giving Mrs Ewing improbable access to the rich and famous as she interviewed and partied with them.
She was also on first name terms with India’s own leading actors and politicians, making her one of the country’s most celebrated journalists.
The stellar names she met and made it a point of being photographed with reads like a Who’s Who, but Anjali revealed that there were three who particularly stood out for her mother throughout her life.
Mrs Ewing was also on first name terms with India’s own leading actors and politicians, making her one of the country’s most celebrated journalists (pictured right with Roberto Rosselini left)
Gulshan Ewing (pictured left) with Tony Randall (pictured right)
Gulshan Ewing (pictured left) with Tony Randall (pictured right)
Anjali recalled: ‘Mum always talked about what a gentleman Gregory Peck was; she was very taken with him. And she used to love imitating Cary Grant’s accent. But her favourite was not somebody you’d expect; Danny Kaye.
‘When she interviewed him, he was really amazed at how she tied her sari and asked her to show him how it was done. He was very interested in learning about it and this really made her laugh. She thought he was very charming.’
Mrs Ewing met her husband Guy in 1954. He was born in Manchester but moved to India at the age of 18, where he followed in his father’s footsteps and worked as a journalist.
Anjali reveals that he proposed on the first day he met her mother at a party in Mumbai but because he was tipsy, she told him to phone the following day and ask again when he was sober. He duly did this and the couple married in 1955 in the city during a small ceremony attended by friends and family.
They also had a son, Roy, who currently lives in Miami and had one grandchild, Anjali’s daughter Faby, 20.
The couple left India in 1990, retiring in Richmond, where Mrs Ewing placed her rare photographs in a box under her bed. They were only discovered by Anjali last year after her mother moved into a nearby care home.

Wedding day photos. Gulshan married husband Guy Ewing. She met him in 1954. He was born in Manchester but moved to India at the age of 18, where he followed in his father’s footsteps and worked as a journalist
Guy Ewing (Gulshan Ewing's husband left) and Gulshan Ewing (right)
Guy Ewing (Gulshan Ewing's husband left) and Gulshan Ewing (right)
Guy passed away two years ago from cancer aged 87, leaving Mrs Ewing so devastated that she never got over it.
‘Theirs was a great love story and they were totally devoted to each other. Dad completely adored mum and when he died, she was completely bereft. She always said that she didn’t want to be here anymore so at least they’re together now,’ said Anjali.
Despite falling to coronavirus, there has been added comfort for Anjali in her mother’s final moments as she now reflects on her life and attempts to give her as fitting a send-off as is possible, given the current situation.
Wearing full personal protection equipment, she was allowed to sit with her ailing mother after being alerted by care home management that she did not have long to live.
Anjali said: ‘One second she was breathing, the next she was not. It happened right in front of my eyes and it was so peaceful. I was holding her hand and stroking her hair and talking to her. I would like to call it a good coronavirus death, if there is such a thing.
‘But for me, death has to be followed by a celebration of life. Mum always told me what a great life she had and how lucky she was. This is what I will always remember.’

No comments:

Post a comment

Bottom Ad [Post Page]