Full width home advertisement

Post Page Advertisement [Top]

'Up to 80 per cent of patients on ventilators will die': Grim warning given to volunteers at NHS Nightingale hospital who are warned 'be prepared to see death'

'Up to 80 per cent of patients on ventilators will die': Grim warning given to volunteers at NHS Nightingale hospital who are warned 'be prepared to see death'
  • A volunteer told the MailOnline they had been told to 'be prepared to see death' when the hospital opens
  •  There also appears to be a shortage of doctors because of a lack of testing for medics
  • It means that senior nurse practitioners are in charge on some wards at the emergency centre at ExCel
  • The Docklands hospital will have 500 beds when it opens, rising to 4,000 at full capacity 
  • Coronavirus symptoms: what are they and should you see a doctor?
Volunteers working at the NHS Nightingale coronavirus hospital have been told to prepare for the fact that up to 80 per cent of patients who are on ventilators will die, MailOnline can reveal.
Selfless heroes flocking to staff the emergency 4,000-bed unit in east London have been told to 'be prepared to see death', with a mortality rate of 50 to 80 per cent among those on ventilators.
There also appears to be a shortage of doctors already before it opens today, because of a lack of testing for medics, leaving senior nurse practitioners in charge on some wards.
Soldiers have played a key role in getting the unit open for business in just a week, with some comparing it to the First World War Battle of the Somme in being the biggest test of their careers. 
Number 10 defended its testing regime for NHS staff today, with the Prime minister's official spokesman saying that more than 2,000 front-line medics in England had been assessed.
'We are very clear that we want more testing to be carried out,' he added, saying that the Government has handed out Government has supplied 390 million pieces of personal protective equipment (PPE) in last two weeks.
It came as:
  • Ministers were accused of 'complacence' and snubbing offers of help from labs as Boris Johnson struggles to get a grip on the UK's coronavirus testing shambles.
  • Nearly a fifth of small British businesses could be forced to close in the next four weeks after running out of cash amid complaints banks are refusing to give them government-backed coronavirus loans. 
  • It was revealed the virus was deemed only a 'moderate risk' to Britain by top scientists five weeks ago.
  • A British firm producing millions of pounds worth of coronavirus tests is selling most of them abroad because the UK doesn't have enough laboratories to use them.
  • A Wuhan doctor who was among the first to alert other medics to the spread of coronavirus has reportedly  disappeared sparking concerns that she has been detained by the hardline Communist regime in China.
Volunteers working at the NHS Nightingale coronavirus hospital have been told to prepare for the fact that up to 80 per cent of patients who are on ventilators will die, MailOnline can reveal
Volunteers working at the NHS Nightingale coronavirus hospital have been told to prepare for the fact that up to 80 per cent of patients who are on ventilators will die, MailOnline can reveal
New staff queue to be allowed into the new Nightingale Hospital in the Excel Centre this morning ahead of its opening
New staff queue to be allowed into the new Nightingale Hospital in the Excel Centre this morning ahead of its opening
Soldiers have played a key role in getting the unit open for business in just a week, with some comparing it to the First World War Battle of the Somme in being the biggest test of their careers
Soldiers have played a key role in getting the unit open for business in just a week, with some comparing it to the First World War Battle of the Somme in being the biggest test of their careers
Selfless heroes flocking to staff the emergency 4,000-bed unit in east London have been told to 'be prepared to see death', with a mortality rate of 50 to 80 per cent among those on ventilators
Selfless heroes flocking to staff the emergency 4,000-bed unit in east London have been told to 'be prepared to see death', with a mortality rate of 50 to 80 per cent among those on ventilators
One volunteer told the MailOnline they had been told to 'be prepared to see death', with a mortality rate of 50 to 80 per cent among those on ventilators
One volunteer told the MailOnline they had been told to 'be prepared to see death', with a mortality rate of 50 to 80 per cent among those on ventilators
The government is desperately trying to ramp up the number of tests carried out, with experts warning that is the only way to end the lockdown threatening to dismantle the economy.
But the PM faces mounting fury over the failure to get anywhere near the levels being carried out in countries like Germany - which is carrying out more than 70,000 a day, while the UK is still well below 10,000.
Communities Secretary Robert Jenrick said 900 NHS staff were tested over the weekend, adding: 'Clearly that's a low number but one we want to build on significantly.'
He told BBC radio 4's Today: 'We now have capacity today to be testing 12,750 people and we expect that within a couple of days to be 15,000. So we should now have the growing capacity to test NHS staff in addition to the patients in critical care.
'We have asked the NHS, Professor Stephen Powis has written to all NHS trusts asking them to think about how they would prioritise staff as to where there are particular shortages or where staff are in the most vulnerable positions.'
Mr Jenrick said he expects 25,000 tests a day by the 'middle of April'.
Asked when the national coronavirus testing centre would be fully operational, Mr Jenrick replied: 'I don't know precisely when that's going to be coming on board.'
He said everything is being brought forward as quickly as possible.
NHS Nightingale, which is in the Excel conference centre in London's Docklands, is due to open today despite building work only starting last Wednesday.
More than 16,000 members of staff could be needed to run it, should it reach full capacity. 
Split into more than 80 wards containing 42 beds each, the Nightingale will become one of the biggest hospitals in the world, according to its chief operating officer Natalie Forrest.
The facility will be used to treat Covid-19 patients who have been transferred from other intensive care units (ICU) across London.
Speaking to visiting reporters, Ms Forrest said a 'scary' number of staff would be needed to run the facility at full capacity and appealed for volunteers to come forward.
'If we have to use this facility, which I really hope we don't because everyone is staying home and washing their hands and social distancing, we will need thousands of doctors and nurses and volunteers to run this facility,' she said.
Asked to clarify how many are required, Ms Forrest said: 'The numbers are scary, but if I tell you that to run one ward, including all of our ancillary staff, we need 200 members of staff.'
The hospital will initially aim to care for 42 patients, before its expansion is 'ramped up' to ensure it can meet its full 4,000-bed capacity in two weeks' time if needed, the Nightingale's chief medical director Alan McGlennan said.
He said coronavirus patients who are transferred to the hospital will already be on a ventilator and will remain at the Nightingale until their course of ventilation is finished.
Coronavirus patients suffering from other serious conditions - such as cardiac issues - will be better cared for at other specialist centres, Mr McGlennan said.
While the Nightingale will be able to provide up to 4,000 ventilator beds if they are needed, NHS London will still have control over the 'most precious resources', he added.

Government is accused of complacency and control-freakery as coronavirus testing shambles spirals 

Ministers were accused of 'complacency' and snubbing offers of help from labs today as Boris Johnson struggles to get a grip on the UK's coronavirus testing shambles.
The government is desperately trying to ramp up the number of checks carried out, with experts warning that is the only way to end the lockdown threatening to dismantle the economy.
But the PM faces mounting fury over the failure to get anywhere near the levels being carried out in countries like Germany - which is carrying out more than 70,000 a day, while the UK is still well below 10,000.
Cabinet minister Michael Gove blamed a global shortage of chemicals at a press conference last night, saying Mr Johnson was taking personal control of trying to source the material.
But within hours he was extraordinarily contradicted by firms, with a statement from the Chemical Industry Association saying despite an 'escalating demand' the 'reagents' for tests 'are being manufactured and delivered to the NHS'. 
Meanwhile, there are complaints that logistical blunders are hampering efforts to increase capacity. The 'centralised' approach by Public Health England (PHE) meant that labs have been left 'sitting on their hands', according to experts.
In contrast, Germany has authorised any institution with the right capability to get on with checks.
The consequences of the lack of testing for current infections was laid bare last night when it emerged that in initial trials 85 per cent of NHS staff who were isolating did not in fact have the virus - meaning they could have been working.

No comments:

Post a comment

Bottom Ad [Post Page]