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Fraudster copies photos of cute rescue animals from a sanctuary's Facebook page and posts them online asking for donations in cruel scam

Fraudster copies photos of cute rescue animals from a sanctuary's Facebook page and posts them online asking for donations in cruel scam
A fraudster who used photos of rescued animals and claimed them as her own to raise money has been reported to the police. 
Emma Haswell, the owner of Brightside Farm Sanctuary in the south of Tasmania, issued a warning to the scammer requesting she stop stealing her photos.   
Ms Haswell claims she has dozens of screenshots of animals the scammer is using to raise money. 
Emma Haswell (pictured), the owner of Brightside Farm Sanctuary in Tasmania, issued a warning to the scammer requesting she stop stealing her photos.
Emma Haswell (pictured), the owner of Brightside Farm Sanctuary in Tasmania, issued a warning to the scammer requesting she stop stealing her photos.
'From the bottom of my heart and the animals too, thank you for all your kind donations,' a screenshot read.
'All of your donations do DIRECTLY to the animals and what they need so very much appreciated.' 
A frustrated Ms Haswell took to Facebook to warn the woman to stop committing fraud.   
'Attention, I know you follow our page and I know you take our animals photos and stories,' Ms Haswell wrote on Facebook. 
'I know you change their names and pretend they are your rescues. I know you ask for donations for yourself.
'This is fraud. The police have been informed. Stop immediately.' 
The scammer used a photo of Tipsy (pictured) asking for money to help look after it
The con artist insists in her posts that the money goes 'directly' to the animals and what they need
The con artist insists in her posts that the money goes 'directly' to the animals and what they need
Ms Haswell said the woman would have scrolled back almost six years through the Brightside Farm Sanctuary Facebook page to find photos. 
'The first one was Tipsy, which is a bizarre choice because she would be one of the best known dogs in Tasmania,' Ms Haswell told The Mercury.
'She changed her name to Lady Grace, but used my descriptions of taking her to the vet.
'There's even photos she's posted of Tipsy on my bed, claiming she's with her. It's very creepy.'
After reporting the distressing matter to police, Ms Haswell was told to issue a complaint on the Federal Government's cyber fraud website. 
She claims she has an address for this 'real person living in Northern Tasmania' and some friends from Western Australia knew of her too. 
Ms Haswell said it 'blows me away' that someone would look at the heartbreaking images of the rescue pets and think they could make money off them. 

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