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Let us spray: St Peter's is sanitised after Vatican reveal faithful will have temperatures checked before Sunday Mass in bid to control coronavirus

Let us spray: St Peter's is sanitised after Vatican reveal faithful will have temperatures checked before Sunday Mass in bid to control coronavirus
  • St Peter's Basilica in the Vatican was sanitised to curb the spread of Covid-19 as it prepares to reopen for mass
  • The Vatican said it will check the temperatures of the faithful for Sunday Mass in new, strict hygiene measures
  • Pope Francis held a private livestreamed mass, joining religious leaders in marking May 14 as a day of prayer
  • Italy has reported 223,096 confirmed cases of coronavirus and 31,368 fatalities as it plans to ease lockdown 
The Vatican was sanitised by men wearing protective overalls ahead of masses restarting next week, as it revealed it will test the temperatures of the faithful before Sunday Mass to curb the spread of coronavirus.
Men wearing protective overalls and masks were seen sanitising St Peter's Basilica in the Vatican today. Workers sanitised all the statues in the basilica, including beneath the baroque sculpted bronze canopy of St. Peter's Baldachin. 
This comes as part of preparations for liturgical celebrations restarting on Monday 18 May for the first time since the two-month lockdown in Italy
The Vatican was sanitised by men wearing protective overalls this morning after it revealed it will test the temperatures of the faithful before Sunday Mass to curb the spread of coronavirus
The Vatican was sanitised by men wearing protective overalls this morning after it revealed it will test the temperatures of the faithful before Sunday Mass to curb the spread of coronavirus
Men wearing protective overalls and masks were seen sanitising St Peter's Basilica in the Vatican on May 15 amid the coronavirus pandemic. Pictured, a man drives a floor cleaning machine
Men wearing protective overalls and masks were seen sanitising St Peter's Basilica in the Vatican on May 15 amid the coronavirus pandemic. Pictured, a man drives a floor cleaning machine
The hygiene measures were announced on Thursday ahead of liturgical celebrations restarting and applies to the Vatican's four Roman basilicas - including St. Peter's Basilica in Vatican City

The hygiene measures were announced on Thursday ahead of liturgical celebrations restarting and applies to the Vatican's four Roman basilicas - including St. Peter's Basilica in Vatican City

Public Masses were banned as part of the initial coronavirus lockdown measures on March 10, a decision that caused fury among the country's Catholic population

The Vatican will conduct temperature checks will at least on Sundays and feast days when larger crowds are expected in an attempt to prevent the spread of coronavirus as masses restart

The Vatican will conduct temperature checks will at least on Sundays and feast days when larger crowds are expected in an attempt to prevent the spread of coronavirus as masses restart
The Vatican also revealed it is planning to check the temperatures of the faithful before they enter its basilicas for Sunday Mass in new hygiene measures.
The measures apply to the Vatican's four Roman basilicas - including St. Peter's Basilica in Vatican City. 
The temperature checks will at least occur on Sundays and feast days when larger crowds are expected. 
The regulations are even more stringent than those adopted by Italian bishops for ordinary parishes around the country.
It prohibits anyone with a fever or who has been in contact with a COVID-19 patient from attending Mass.
Public Masses were banned as part of the initial coronavirus lockdown measures on March 10, a decision that caused fury among the country's Catholic population. 
The bishops told the government they could 'not accept seeing the exercise of freedom of religion being compromised'. Most of Italy's churches have remained open during the crisis, but only for individual prayer. 
The Vatican's safety measures are even more strict than at parish churches, which will resume public masses on Monday, following a detailed hygiene and security protocol that prohibits anyone with a fever or who has been in contact with a COVID-19 patient from attending Mass
The Vatican's safety measures are even more strict than at parish churches, which will resume public masses on Monday, following a detailed hygiene and security protocol that prohibits anyone with a fever or who has been in contact with a COVID-19 patient from attending Mass
Churches will restart mass across the nation from May 18 as Italy has set out steps to ease social distancing measures and as it enters 'phase two' of its lockdown exit plan, which sees people allowed outside their homes
Churches will restart mass across the nation from May 18 as Italy has set out steps to ease social distancing measures and as it enters 'phase two' of its lockdown exit plan, which sees people allowed outside their homes
Men wearing protective overalls and masks spray sanitiser on the famous marble cherubs during the sanitation of St. Peter's Basilica during deep clean
Men wearing protective overalls and masks spray sanitiser on the famous marble cherubs during the sanitation of St. Peter's Basilica during deep clean 
The Vatican also revealed it is planning to check the temperatures of the faithful before they enter its basilicas for Sunday Mass in new hygiene measures. Pictured, a floor cleaning machine is used in St Peter's Basilica
The Vatican also revealed it is planning to check the temperatures of the faithful before they enter its basilicas for Sunday Mass in new hygiene measures. Pictured, a floor cleaning machine is used in St Peter's Basilica 
Masses for the public can resume on May 18 but under strict conditions outlined in a protocol signed by Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte and Cardinal Gualtiero Bassetti, president of the Italian Bishops Conference.  
The Vatican hasn't said when Pope Francis would preside over his first post-lockdown celebration in St. Peter's, but it has agreed with the prelates who run its basilicas to adopt necessary safety guarantees. 
But the Pope appeared at the chapel of the Domus Sanctae Marthae in the Vatican to conduct a private and livestreamed mass on May 14. 
During the mass, the Pope called for believers of every religion to call on God for mercy during the pandemic.
He joined other religious leaders in marking May 14 as a day of prayer, fasting and acts of charity to ask God to stop the coronavirus pandemic.   
Pope Francis holding the Holy Bread while celebrating the Eucharist during a private and live broadcast morning mass at the chapel of his Santa Marta residence in The Vatican
Pope Francis holding the Holy Bread while celebrating the Eucharist during a private and live broadcast morning mass at the chapel of his Santa Marta residence in The Vatican
Italy has reported 223,096 confirmed cases of coronavirus and 31,368 fatalities, according to official figures. Pictured, men walk through the basilica during the sanitation process
Italy has reported 223,096 confirmed cases of coronavirus and 31,368 fatalities, according to official figures. Pictured, men walk through the basilica during the sanitation process 
Pope Francis joined other religious leaders in marking May 14 as a day of prayer, fasting and acts of charity to ask God to stop the coronavirus pandemic. Pictured, the area around St Peter's statue is cleaned
'We are all united as human beings, as brothers and sisters, praying to God each according to our own culture, traditions and beliefs, but brothers and sisters praying to God.
'This is important: brothers and sisters fasting, asking God to pardon our sins so that the Lord would have mercy on us, that the Lord would forgive us, that the Lord would stop this pandemic,' he said according to Crux.
Italy has reported 223,096 confirmed cases of coronavirus and 31,368 fatalities, according to official figures. 
The country has set out strict steps to ease social distancing measures and the nation is now entering 'phase two' of its lockdown exit plan.
Laws which had forbidden Italians from leaving their houses without permits and restricted shopping to supermarkets were eased on Monday May 4, allowing for people to travel within their regions and for markets to reopen.  
It was the first European country to be hit by the COVID-19 pandemic.

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