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Georgia residents face long lines on first day of early voting. Some voters had to wait 'six hours or more' to cast their ballot.

Several Georgia precincts saw long lines Monday, as voters reportedly turned out in record numbers to head to the polls on the first day of early voting in the state.

What are the details?

The Associated Press reported that some locations were overwhelmed by the number of voters who turned out make their voices heard in the general election, with many people waiting several hours as poll workers battled technical difficulties and overall lack of space. Some critics declared the situation was evidence of voter suppression.

"Eager voters endured waits of six hours or more in Cobb County, which was once solidly Republican but has voted for Democrats in recent elections, and joined lines that wrapped around polling places in solidly Democratic DeKalb County," the outlet reported. "They also turned out in big numbers in north Georgia's Floyd County, where support for President Donald Trump is strong."

According to The Hill, technical issues with pollbooks (used to check in voters) caused major delays at State Farm Arena in Atlanta, but the situation was resolved after an hour or so.

NBC News published the experience of Cobb County voter Everlean Rutherford, who tweeted out a video of a long line in the morning hours at her polling place, writing, "I LOVE this. Early voting started today in Georgia. This is the voting line in Cobb County. You see this."

Rutherford sent out a number of updates throughout the day before finally tweeting, "Just finished voting. I started at 10:04 and just finished at 7:43pm."

Former Missouri Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill tweeted out a separate video from Georgia, alleging, "This is a picture of voter suppression. Why do Americans have to wait in lines this long? This is the line in Suwannee Georgia today to vote."

McCaskill received pushback from some people over the allegation of voter suppression. Jay Caruso, managing editor of The Washington Examiner, argued in an extensive thread that after living in Georgia for five years, he could attest that "it is one of the easiest states to both register and vote."

Others responded in agreement with the former Missouri senator, with one person arguing, "It's voter suppression because not everyone can stand in line for EIGHT FREAKING HOURS in the heat to vote! People have passed out, some have had to leave to go to work or pick up kids. This is a district that went for Hillary [Clinton] so the GOP wants to make it hard for them to vote!"


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